Using static and theme resources in Windows 8.1 XAML

Well, this stopped me up for a few days so I thought I’d write down the answer – which was surprisingly subtle!

The Problem:
You are using Visual Studio 2013 to create a Windows 8.1 Store App. You want to create centralized styles, or even theme-specific styles for UI controls. So, you create a resource dictionary and reference it like this in your App.xaml:

<Application.Resources>
    <x:String x:Key="AppName">My App Name</x:String>
    <ResourceDictionary>
        <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
            <ResourceDictionary Source="Common/CommonStyles.xaml"/>
        </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
    </ResourceDictionary>
</Application.Resources>

.csharpcode, .csharpcode pre
{
font-size: small;
color: black;
font-family: consolas, “Courier New”, courier, monospace;
background-color: #ffffff;
/*white-space: pre;*/
}
.csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; }
.csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; }
.csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; }
.csharpcode .str { color: #006080; }
.csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; }
.csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; }
.csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; }
.csharpcode .html { color: #800000; }
.csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; }
.csharpcode .alt
{
background-color: #f4f4f4;
width: 100%;
margin: 0em;
}
.csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

But wait a second, now I get a XAML validation error in my App.xaml file:

mx3F25

EVERY single reference I can find, has a ResourceDictionary WITHOUT an x:Key. But OK Visual Studio, I’ll add a key for it. Now, on some arbitrary page in my project, let me try to reference a resource defined in CommonStyles.xaml:

mx32EF8

That was where I was early in the week. I’ve spent a significant chunk of the week trying to figure out why this didn’t work. Well, I ran across this blog post and video:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/mspfe/archive/2014/01/14/xaml-styles-and-themed-resources-in-windows-8-1.aspx

But again, this guy too was barking up the wrong tree! He has a ResourceDictionary defined with no key – yet his app worked. And wait, he was specifically working on an 8.1 app!

I watched the video embedded on that page several times, and re-wound to try to find what I was missing…

The Solution:
It’s pretty subtle, but when you define a ResourceDictionary, you can no longer have other elements at that root level. They need to move into your new ResourceDictionary.

In other words, instead of this:

<Application.Resources>
    <x:String x:Key="AppName">My App Name</x:String>
    <ResourceDictionary x:Key="Default">
        <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
            <ResourceDictionary Source="Common/CommonStyles.xaml"/>
        </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
    </ResourceDictionary>
</Application.Resources>

.csharpcode, .csharpcode pre
{
font-size: small;
color: black;
font-family: consolas, “Courier New”, courier, monospace;
background-color: #ffffff;
/*white-space: pre;*/
}
.csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; }
.csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; }
.csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; }
.csharpcode .str { color: #006080; }
.csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; }
.csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; }
.csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; }
.csharpcode .html { color: #800000; }
.csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; }
.csharpcode .alt
{
background-color: #f4f4f4;
width: 100%;
margin: 0em;
}
.csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

Do this:

<Application.Resources>
    <ResourceDictionary>
        <ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
            <ResourceDictionary Source="Common/CommonStyles.xaml"/>
        </ResourceDictionary.MergedDictionaries>
        <x:String x:Key="AppName">My App Name</x:String>
    </ResourceDictionary>
</Application.Resources>

.csharpcode, .csharpcode pre
{
font-size: small;
color: black;
font-family: consolas, “Courier New”, courier, monospace;
background-color: #ffffff;
/*white-space: pre;*/
}
.csharpcode pre { margin: 0em; }
.csharpcode .rem { color: #008000; }
.csharpcode .kwrd { color: #0000ff; }
.csharpcode .str { color: #006080; }
.csharpcode .op { color: #0000c0; }
.csharpcode .preproc { color: #cc6633; }
.csharpcode .asp { background-color: #ffff00; }
.csharpcode .html { color: #800000; }
.csharpcode .attr { color: #ff0000; }
.csharpcode .alt
{
background-color: #f4f4f4;
width: 100%;
margin: 0em;
}
.csharpcode .lnum { color: #606060; }

Notice the change? The AppName setting or anything else which was defined at the Application.Resources level must now move into your default ResourceDictionary. Now, voila! The resource name resolves:

mx3F3BC

By the way, if you want to do theme-specific styles, that video above covers that very simply too – check it out, and it does apply to Windows 8.1. This is significant because several things about themes and resource lookups have changed from 8.0 to 8.1.

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Uncategorized, Visual Studio, Windows Store, XAML

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Archives
Categories

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 2 other followers

%d bloggers like this: