A few admin and a few security things…

I’ve been behind in my blog schedule because school has been a little more intense than I was expecting. 3 more weeks until this session is done, then the next 8-week session should be lighter. In the meantime here is some ketchup, er catch up:

This Blog Moved:
Next, you might notice that I moved to WordPress. First, I think it’s a humble and good thing that Live realized they had kind of a crappy blog platform. They are the ones that actually “move” your blog to the WordPress platform. WordPress, if you are not familiar is pretty much the state of the art for blogging. There isn’t much it doesn’t support – and it’s an open source platform so one might “move” their blog to another domain with very little effort. So Live gave me a wizard and basically moved the blog over. Any RSS feeds automatically point people to the new address. Plus, if you go to http://robertseder.spaces.live.com – it automatically redirects you to http://robseder.wordpress.com – very smooth migration! So just to be clear:

New blog URL: http://RobSeder.wordpress.com/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/RobSeder/

ISC2 Scholarship Program:
ISC2 announced their $100,000 scholarship program for those pursuing professional development in the security arena. You can read more about it here:  https://www.isc2.org/scholarship/Default.aspx

Companies MUST research you online before hiring you:
This was a really great article from Bruce Schneier:

http://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/2010/10/monitoring_empl.html

It basically talks about liability. If you publish things that are offensive or indicate violence anywhere on the web, it is part of the due diligence for a hiring company to make an honest effort to research your online life. So what started as a “companies MIGHT google you or look you up on facebook” is starting to turn into a “companies MUST research you” before hiring you. After all, if you go on a shooting rampage or end up in a sexual harassment lawsuit – the company would be wide open to claims of “he/she showed all the signs on these publicly-available sources, why didn’t you more thoroughly investigate his/her publicly available background?”

This is a pretty slippery slope! This hopefully is also a wake-up call to everyone that you are no where near as “invisible” as you think you are when you post information online. Especially in that God-foresaken Facebook, which has ridiculously insufficient security controls. Make a point to google yourself. When you aren’t logged in anywhere, try to find out what information is available about you. Do you have drunken photos on flickr? inappropriate comments on facebook? inappropriate videos on youtube?

This isn’t to say you can’t have an online precense for your personal life, you just may want to do that under a pseudonym. Even better, pick a very common pseudonym so that even a search for that, brings up a lot of “noise” of other people. You may also want to simply use a fake, alternate (but realistic) identity – see: http://www.fakenamegenerator.com/ – but you should make an effort to make sure that if someone googles your real name, it brings up appropriate information about you. That is, if you are in the working world!

October is National Cyber Security Awareness Month (NCSAM):
The National Cyber Security Alliance and “StaySafeOnline.org” is a great organization aimed at protecting young people on the web. This include cyberbulling, cyber criminals, online predators, etc. If you represent a company or organization, you should consider endorsing this effort:

Main StaySafeOnline.org page:
http://www.staysafeonline.org/

Here’s the page to endorse the initiative (for free):
http://www.staysafeonline.org/cybersecurity-awareness-month/endorse-ncsam

And here are some online safety videos:
http://www.staysafeonline.org/tools-resources/staysafeonline-videos

Lastly, along the same lines – this is my favorite online awareness video, it’s from the Ad Council. I hope that it sinks in with younger people – I think this video hits (at least this one) nail on the head:

Posted in Security, Uncategorized

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